19 Comments


  1. ·
    1. johanhaleby
      ·

      Unfortunately I’ve not yet had the opportunity to look into openshift.

      Reply
  2. Tomas
    ·

    Have a look at Rancher and RancherOS (that said it works perfect on any linux with docker engine).

    Reply
    1. johanhaleby
      ·

      Unfortunately I haven’t had the chance to look into Rancher/OS much.

      Reply
      1. Jay
        ·

        I’d +1 Rancher. You can even use it to create a Kubernetes layer (similar to DCOS) that uses the Rancher networking. What this gives you is Ubernetes benefits, already solved.

        Not to mention it’s much easier to set up on AWS since Rancher itself is a container.

        Reply
        1. Bob
          ·

          +1 on Rancher as well. It’s hands down the best framework at the moment in terms of flexibility, security, maintenance… you name it. Kubernetes can run on it too.

          Reply
  3. Paul Kearney
    ·

    Nice write-up. Very useful overview and explanation of the various aspects of each.

    Reply
  4. Steven B
    ·

    Is there a reason you didn’t consider Cloud Foundry in your evaluation?

    I’m curious if it was previously eliminated for some reason, or if it didn’t even come up in your competitive research. It seems like it would tick off most of your original requirements:

    – Stable and mature
    – Open Source
    – Multiple backers and contributors
    – Supports Docker
    – Competing options for “CF as a Service”
    – Multi-cloud, provisioning “apps” across servers, etc.

    Might be something worth considering in the future!

    FD: I work on the CF team 🙂

    Reply
    1. johanhaleby
      ·

      There was no particular reason other than time constraints. I’ve never tried CF but I’ve read and heard about it and it seems interesting as well. Maybe next time 🙂

      Reply

  5. ·

    Johan, I’ve very happy to see such a rigorous study and to see that k8s came out on top (although I’m hardly unbiased : ).

    Can you say more about “while everything didn’t work perfectly, at least we could find a way to workaround all of the problems we encountered”? We’d love to hear what didn’t work and what you had to do to work around it. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. johanhaleby
      ·

      I’ll try to get a new blog post out today describing this.

      Reply
  6. Walter
    ·

    A concise table would have been nice.

    Reply

  7. ·

  8. ·

    If you are looking for an alternative to docker-compose, check out @openshift’s Source-to-image (s2i) is a tool for building reproducible Docker images. s2i produces ready-to-run images by injecting source code into a Docker image and assembling a new Docker image which incorporates the builder image and built source. The result is then ready to use with docker run. s2i supports incremental builds which re-use previously downloaded dependencies, previously built artifacts, etc.

    more here: https://github.com/openshift/source-to-image

    Reply

  9. ·
  10. Wei
    ·

    Good read.. I often time think if one can explain a somewhat complicated technique in a very simple intuitive way that even 1st graders can understand, then he/she really thinks things through and understands the gist of it.
    However, as mentioned by previous comments, a list of criterias as how you view that one should consider as the most important implementation aspects should be helpful to guide the whole read; as we all know technology moves fast but fundamentals do not change much……

    Reply

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